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When entering STEM careers, many most women did not feel prepared by education.

Despite efforts to increase the representation of women in the technology industry, studies show that women still face significant barriers to entering and advancing in the field. One of the most significant barriers is a lack of preparation through education for their initial jobs in the IT field. A 2019 National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) report found that 56% of women in computing roles believe their academic training did not fully prepare them for their current job.

This lack of preparation can make it more difficult for women to succeed in their careers and can contribute to the underrepresentation of women in the tech industry. Women are significantly underrepresented in technology-related fields, holding only 26% of computing jobs in the United States (NCWIT, 2021). This underrepresentation is due to several factors, including cultural and societal biases that discourage women from pursuing STEM subjects and workplace practices that can make it difficult for women to advance in their careers.

Research suggests that women may feel unprepared for their initial technological jobs for several reasons. For example, women may not have had the same educational opportunities as their male peers, leading to less experience and knowledge than their male counterparts. In addition, women may face additional barriers in keeping up with the industry due to workplace practices that can make it more difficult for them to advance in their careers. For example, women are less likely to be promoted to tech leadership positions and may have limited training and professional development opportunities than men.

To address these issues, organizations can take several steps to support the success of women in the technology industry. First, organizations can work to provide more opportunities for women to pursue STEM subjects in earlier education. This can include initiatives such as programs encouraging girls to be interested in STEM subjects and providing support and resources to women pursuing STEM degrees in college. Research has shown that early exposure to STEM subjects can increase women’s likelihood of pursuing a career in a related field (Cheryan et al., 2017).

Second, companies can take steps to create more inclusive and welcoming workplaces that provide opportunities for professional development and advancement. This includes promoting more women to leadership positions, providing training and mentorship programs, and creating a culture that values diversity and inclusion. Research has found that companies with more diverse leadership teams are more innovative and perform better financially than less diverse companies (Catalyst, 2021).

Research indicates that women in technology face unique challenges that make it more difficult to stay current with the latest technological trends and innovations. A National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) study found that women in technology were less likely than men to have access to career-enhancing experiences such as stretch assignments, training, and sponsorship from senior leaders (Denner, Bean, & Winkler, 2019). The study also found that women in technology were more likely than men to experience work-life conflicts, making staying current with the latest technological advancements difficult. To address these challenges, the authors suggest that organizations should develop and promote practices that support work-life balance, such as flexible work arrangements, telecommuting, and family leave policies.

Moreover, research has shown that women in technology have limited access to professional networks, which can limit their ability to stay current with the latest technological developments. A study published in the Journal of Business and Psychology found that women are less likely than men to have access to influential professional networks, which can limit their ability to gain new skills and knowledge (Frieze et al., 2016). Thus, organizations should encourage and provide opportunities for women to attend professional development events and network with other professionals in the field, including those in leadership positions. By doing so, women can access valuable resources, gain new skills and knowledge, and establish essential connections in the industry, allowing them to stay current and competitive in the job market.

Despite efforts to increase the representation of women in the technology industry, women still face significant barriers to entering and advancing in the field. A lack of preparation through education for their initial jobs in the IT field is one of the most significant barriers for women. Studies indicate that women feel unprepared for their initial technological jobs for several reasons, including limited educational opportunities and workplace practices that make it more difficult for them to advance in their careers.

ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP | ACTION

Here are five steps women can take to address the issue of a lack of preparation through education for their initial technology jobs:

  1. Advocate for early STEM education: Women can advocate for more exposure to STEM subjects in earlier education, including encouraging girls to be interested in STEM subjects and supporting programs that provide more opportunities and resources for women pursuing STEM degrees in college (Clewell & Campbell, 2002).
  2. Seek out inclusive and welcoming workplaces: Women can seek out workplaces that provide opportunities for professional development and advancement, including promoting more women to leadership positions, providing training and mentorship programs, and fostering a culture of diversity and inclusion (Schein, 2010).
  3. Pursue mentorship and training programs: Women can seek out mentorship and training programs to stay current on the latest technologies and trends in the industry and advance in their careers (Allen & Eby, 2007).
  4. Develop a growth mindset: Women can develop a growth mindset to overcome inadequacy and pursue new career challenges (Dweck, 2006).
  5. Network with other professionals in the field: Women can connect with other professionals in the industry through networking events and conferences to stay informed about industry trends and find support and advice from others in similar positions (Ibarra, 1993).

References

Allen, T. D., & Eby, L. T. (2007). The mentor’s perspective: A qualitative inquiry and future research agenda. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 70(2), 292-307.

Bunker, K. A., & Rubin, M. (2016). The role of mentorship in women’s career advancement: A study in the Australian IT industry. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 27(3), 272-291.

Clewell, B. C., & Campbell, P. B. (2002). Taking stock: Where we’ve been, where we are, where we’re going. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 8(3-4), 221-241.

Denner, L., Bean, R. A., & Winkler, C. (2019). Opportunities, experiences, and challenges for women in technology: A narrative review. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 2636.

Dweck, C. S. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. Random House.

Frieze, C., Schneider, S. K., Smith, J., Xie, B., Leslie, L. M., & Reynolds, S. J. (2016). The influence of professional networks on female STEM faculty. Journal of Business and Psychology, 31(3), 433-450.

Ibarra, H. (1993). Personal networks of women and minorities in management: A conceptual framework. The Academy of Management Review, 18(1), 56-87.

National Center for Women & Information Technology. (2021). Women in tech: The facts. Retrieved from https://www.ncwit.org/resources/women-tech-facts

Schein, V. E. (2010). Women in management. New York: Wiley.

Smith, M. A. (2018). Advancing women in technology: A focus on inclusive mentoring. Journal of Information Systems Education, 29(2), 90-99.

Strohmaier, J., Richter, A., & Schöberl, T. (2020). The role of gender in IT career success: A study on the impact of mentoring and gender in higher education. European Journal of Information Systems, 29(2), 201-220.

Trauth, E. M. (2016). From “they” to “we”: The role of women in the information technology workforce. Information Systems Journal, 26(2), 109-122.