+1 972-210-9110
dralford@thedrced.com

Blog

Is it mentorship or just unstructured support conversations?

Mentorship is an important aspect of career development, providing guidance, support, and opportunities for growth and learning. In the technology industry, mentorship programs have become increasingly common as companies seek to promote diversity and inclusion in the workplace. However, studies have shown that women mentoring programs have been less used and formal with women, even though women in technology can benefit greatly from mentorship.

One reason women’s mentoring programs have been less used and formal with women is the lack of representation of women in leadership positions in the tech industry. According to a National Center for Women & Information Technology report, women hold only 25% of computing jobs, and only 11% of executives in the technology industry are women. This lack of representation can make it more difficult for women to find mentors in the industry who are experienced and respected professionals.

Additionally, cultural and societal biases may discourage women from seeking mentorship in the tech industry. Women in technology may feel that they are not valued or respected in the industry, making it more difficult to seek mentorship opportunities. They may also feel that their male mentors do not relate as well to women. Male mentors may not fully understand women’s unique challenges and experiences in the industry.

Another factor contributing to the lack of formal women mentoring programs in the tech industry is the perception that mentorship is a “soft skill” not as important as technical skills. This perception can make it more difficult for women to find mentors willing to invest time and resources into their career development.

To address these issues, it is important to create more formal women mentoring programs in the tech industry designed specifically to meet the needs and challenges of women in the field. These programs should be designed to provide guidance, support, and opportunities for growth and learning. They should be structured to address women’s unique challenges and experiences in the industry.

Additionally, it is important to promote women to leadership positions in the tech industry, which can help create more opportunities for women to find experienced and respected mentors. This can include providing more opportunities for women to take on leadership roles within their organizations and promoting women to more broadly leadership positions in the industry.

Finally, addressing cultural and societal biases that discourage women from seeking mentorship opportunities in the tech industry is essential. This can include promoting diversity and inclusion as the organization’s core values, providing training and education on unconscious bias, and creating more opportunities for women to connect with other professionals in the field.

Women in technology can benefit greatly from mentorship programs that provide guidance, support, and opportunities for growth and learning. However, the lack of formal women mentoring programs in the tech industry has made it more difficult for women to find mentors who are experienced and respected professionals. By creating more formal women mentoring programs, promoting women to leadership positions, and addressing cultural and societal biases that discourage women from seeking mentorship opportunities, we can help create a more inclusive and equitable tech industry that benefits everyone.

ORGANIZATION LEADERSHIP | ACTION

Here are five steps organizations can take to support women mentoring programs in the tech industry:

  1. Provide structured mentorship programs: Structured mentorship programs can help to establish clear expectations and goals for both mentors and mentees, increase program effectiveness, and reduce barriers to participation (Johnson & Ridley, 2008). Organizations can provide formal mentorship programs tailored to meet women’s unique needs in technology and designed to help them overcome the challenges they face in the industry.
  2. Training for mentors and mentees: Training for mentors and mentees can help enhance the effectiveness of mentorship programs (Ragins & Verbos, 2007). Organizations can provide training on effective communication, goal-setting, and career development to mentors and mentees to help them maximize the program’s benefits.
  3. Promote diversity and inclusion: Promoting diversity and inclusion as core values can help create a culture that supports women in technology and increase the effectiveness of mentorship programs (Pless & Maak, 2011). Organizations can create policies and initiatives that promote diversity and inclusion and ensure that these values are reflected in all aspects of the organization.
  4. Establish metrics for program success: Establishing metrics for program success can help organizations to measure the impact of their mentorship programs and identify areas for improvement (Phillips & Connell, 2002). Organizations can establish key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure the effectiveness of their mentorship programs, such as retention rates, promotions, or employee satisfaction surveys.
  5. Encourage networking and community building: Networking and community building can help enhance mentorship programs’ effectiveness by providing additional support and opportunities for growth and learning (Allen & O’Brien, 2006). Organizations can provide opportunities for women in technology to connect, such as employee resource groups, conferences, or social events, to help build a support community and promote networking.

References

Allen, T. D., & O’Brien, K. E. (2006). Formal mentoring programs and organizational attraction. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 69(1), 154-164.

Johnson, W. B., & Ridley, C. R. (2008). The elements of effective mentoring: A conceptual framework for developing and mentoring researchers. Journal of Management Education, 32(2), 217-236.

Pless, N. M., & Maak, T. (2011). Responsible leadership: Pathways to the future. Journal of Business Ethics, 98(3), 3-13.

Phillips, J. J., & Connell, A. O. (2002). Quantitative evaluation of mentoring programs. Journal of Career Development, 29(3), 197-211.

Ragins, B. R., & Verbos, A. K. (2007). Positive relationships in action: Relational mentoring and mentoring schemas in the workplace. In B. R. Ragins & K. E. Kram (Eds.), The handbook of mentoring at work: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 165-190). Sage Publications.